Cannot register without credit card

The Gitlab.com instance has required a credit card for using the CI feature for a while now.
However, it seems now users are required to enter a phone number and credit card to register even for basic functionality. Both are very personal information and considering that it now seems impossible to even create issues on open source projects without providing these information, this is very concerning.

Note that I have been trying to register for several days using different IP addresses, different browsers and different PCs and I was still asked for credit card information during registration every single time.

Please reconsider this approach and looks at how other services like github do this where no personal information aside from email is required at all.

I am disappointed that you didn’t get a response here. I just tried to sign up for an account and am also really surprised, not in a good way, to see this.

I don’t see how many people would be willing to provide their phone number and credit card to report an issue on someone’s open source project. I certainly am not; I won’t be signing up.
Sure, this is probably no great loss to the GitLab company because I was unlikely to spend any money to report issues on some projects.

It kind of makes fun of the whole ‘Moving to GitLab’ campaign a few years ago. I have been guilty of telling people that GitLab was a viable alternative to GitHub for a few years now, but this decision is just so crazy, it is beyond me how anyone at GitLab signed off on it.
I could understand if it was just for CI minutes given the real risk of costly abuse etc but to do a basic account registration at all? It’s beyond belief.

It also portrays a feeling that GitLab is too expensive (inefficient?) to run even for GitLab themselves.
Surely user conversion rates can’t be that good with this??? I just don’t get it at all. I know the industry has to move away from offering things for free but for something like GitLab you want to keep the network effect open so people can actually interact with open source projects and maybe get them hooked with a reasonable free quota for their own repositories; not saying you have to be excessively generous but this barrier just seems so opposed to what you’d expect the goals of GitLab to be.

Anyway, sorry to ramble, just… confused!