Public projects requiring GitLab Ultimate features should apply for the GitLab for Open Source program

The GitLab for Open Source program was created because GitLab believes in a world where everyone can contribute and we like to support those who share our mission.

  • Public open source projects requiring GitLab Ultimate features will need to be part of the GitLab for Open Source program as a result of changes to our free tier. Those changes include:

  • Free tier public projects will no longer receive Ultimate by default and must apply for Open Source program to continue benefits.

  • Public projects will be included in the CI/CD minutes quotas of 400 minutes for free users.

A detailed frequently asked questions document outlines the upcoming changes and how you can manage the changes to your free GitLab SaaS account.

In order to publish your feedback regarding this change, please add a reply to this thread.

Thank you very much for taking the time to provide us with your perspective. Please allow our Product Team some time to review the input you add here.

Please note that this forum recognizes GitLab’s Code of Conduct :fox_face:.

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@sugaroverflow How does one chase up an application to the GitLab for Open Source program? I completed the process (on behalf of our community organisation) a number of weeks back but still haven’t received a response.

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Hello @myii - Thanks for reaching out. I just replied to your email as well. Your application was marked as expired in our queue (not entirely sure why yet). We’ll take a look at it today! Thanks for your patience and interest in joining the GitLab for Open Source Program.

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Thanks, @chupy. I did get an e-mail, which I responded to last Friday. I haven’t received a response since then, so I’d appreciate it if you could have another look.

Reading the FAQ, I would ask for clarity on the following point

Q. I am an active contributor to GitLab. Will the same limits be applicable to me as well?
A. All free tier users receive 50,000 CI/CD minutes for running pipelines on public forks of public open source projects, like GitLab. Contributions to all other projects by free tier users are subject to the new limits

When this refers to ‘open source projects’, is this meaning all public projects under an open source license, or is it only meaning those subset of open source projects who have chosen to join the “GitLab for Open Source Program” ?

I’m hoping it refers to the former, because I suspect many (possibly even most) smaller scale OSS projects aren’t going to jump through the hoops to join the special Program.

I’m pretty sure it means you would have to be registered with the Open Source program. Otherwise everyone could claim open source and abuse all the minutes and Gitlab’s platform - just like when people were crypto mining and killing all the shared runners.

Hi,

I have a couple of questions before I apply to the program on behalf of our community.
1- One of our projects has a dual license Apache 2.0 AND BDS-3-Clause (both OSI approved),
with 2 license files, GitLan shows “Other” in the overview.
I unsuccessfully tried different things to make GitLab identify both licenses, so I can take the first screenshot of the project overview, the only workaround I found was to concatenate both files in one LICENSE file but GitLab only identify the Apache 2.0 license, it’s that ok?

2- Also a project in the same namespace, is the website HTML code of the project (using a GitLab Page), its license is CC-BY-SA-4.0, which is not listed as OSI approved.
Could this be a problem when applying for the Open Source program?

Thanks

Hi @germag! :wave:

Thanks for sending along your questions. I am happy to help. I’ll address each one below.

1- One of our projects has a dual license Apache 2.0 AND BDS-3-Clause (both OSI approved), with 2 license files, GitLan shows “Other” in the overview. I unsuccessfully tried different things to make GitLab identify both licenses, so I can take the first screenshot of the project overview, the only workaround I found was to concatenate both files in one LICENSE file but GitLab only identify the Apache 2.0 license, it’s that ok?

Thanks for bringing this to our attention, and for your kind offer to concatenate the files. But that won’t be necessary. When you apply, simply choose either license to screenshot and we’ll take it from there.

2- Also a project in the same namespace, is the website HTML code of the project (using a GitLab Page), its license is CC-BY-SA-4.0, which is not listed as OSI approved.

You’re correct that Creative Commons licenses aren’t OSI-approved; however, as the CC-licensed project is among many other projects in your namespace that are carrying OSI-approved licenses, I feel confident saying this won’t be an issue for your enrollment in the GItLab for Open Source Program. We’ll know for sure when we’re able to review your application.

I hope that helps! Looking forward to seeing your application.

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